mpdrolet:

Vanda Dr. Anek X Lenavat,  2006
Linda Broadfoot

mpdrolet:

Vanda Dr. Anek X Lenavat, 2006

Linda Broadfoot

grupaok:

Robert Smithson, Proposal for a Monument at Antarctica, 1966

grupaok:

Robert Smithson, Proposal for a Monument at Antarctica, 1966

likeafieldmouse:

Wild Honeycomb

likeafieldmouse:

Wild Honeycomb

blondheadtotoe:

Photographer : Renaud CambuzatAssistant : Marine Arragain Styling : Marine Souq Hair : Jonathan Dadoun Make up : Marie Viat Model : Zélig Wilson

ig : @monpetitlapinmort

blondheadtotoe:

Photographer : Renaud Cambuzat
Assistant : Marine Arragain 
Styling : Marine Souq 
Hair : Jonathan Dadoun 
Make up : Marie Viat 
Model : Zélig Wilson

ig : @monpetitlapinmort

joelnewman:

Premiere of Karim Aïnouz’s Domingo (Sunday)www.videobrasil.org.br

joelnewman:

Premiere of Karim Aïnouz’s Domingo (Sunday)

www.videobrasil.org.br

vintagenational:

Ad for Travelers insurance.
August, 1952.
Illustration by Andre Durenceau.

vintagenational:

Ad for Travelers insurance.

August, 1952.

Illustration by Andre Durenceau.

mpdrolet:

Brendan Austin

mpdrolet:

Brendan Austin

lowpresssure:

"Cartographies of the Absolute"
Alberto Toscano & Jeff Kinkle, with Melanie Gilligan
Discussion: Friday, October 10, 2014, 7pm
Artists Space Books & Talks55 Walker Street
$5 Entrance DonationMembers Free, Guaranteed Entry
“Alberto Toscano and Jeff Kinkle’s forthcoming book, “Cartographies of the Absolute,” addresses the proliferation of works in the visual arts, film and literature that seek to tackle the representation of contemporary capitalism. Their research, which began in 2009 with a collaborative text on the HBO series The Wire, forms a critical survey of works that “totalize” current conditions and look to “thematize those facets of social existence which are particularly symptomatic of the trends and tensions in today’s political economy: financial markets, logistical complexes, commodity chains, and so on.” Inherent in this turn to figuration is the fundamental paradox of a desire to represent that which is ordinarily invisible; an “absolute” capitalist system resistant to being contained and comprehended in a single overview. 
http://artistsspace.org/programs/cartographies-of-the-absolute

lowpresssure:

"Cartographies of the Absolute"

Alberto Toscano & Jeff Kinkle, with Melanie Gilligan

Discussion: Friday, October 10, 2014, 7pm

Artists Space Books & Talks
55 Walker Street

$5 Entrance Donation
Members Free, Guaranteed Entry

Alberto Toscano and Jeff Kinkle’s forthcoming book, “Cartographies of the Absolute,” addresses the proliferation of works in the visual arts, film and literature that seek to tackle the representation of contemporary capitalism. Their research, which began in 2009 with a collaborative text on the HBO series The Wire, forms a critical survey of works that “totalize” current conditions and look to “thematize those facets of social existence which are particularly symptomatic of the trends and tensions in today’s political economy: financial markets, logistical complexes, commodity chains, and so on.” Inherent in this turn to figuration is the fundamental paradox of a desire to represent that which is ordinarily invisible; an “absolute” capitalist system resistant to being contained and comprehended in a single overview. 

http://artistsspace.org/programs/cartographies-of-the-absolute

nickkahler:

David Chipperfield vs. Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Sticks and Stones at the Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin, Germany, 2014 (via ummhello)

(Source : jacksoul)

humanoidhistory:

A mausoleum in the ancient city of Tus, Iran, photo by Ernst Herzfeld (1879-1948). (Possibly Mongol? And has it been restored? See here and here.)
(Smithsonian)

humanoidhistory:

mausoleum in the ancient city of Tus, Iran, photo by Ernst Herzfeld (1879-1948). (Possibly Mongol? And has it been restored? See here and here.)

(Smithsonian)

archatlas:

Padiglione Italia. Innesti/ Grafting - Ambienti taglia e incolla Beniamino Servino

A sample of the International Architecture Exhibition - Section “Environments Cut and Paste” Scientific coordination by Emilia Giorgi

lambtime:

Ernst Cramer (1898 - 1980)
Garten des Poeten (Poet’s Garden)

The Poet’s Garden is likely the most important garden in all of Cramer’s professional career. 
He worked with minimal means and maximum abstraction instead of imitating nature and as a result, kicked off a new art form called Land Art, creating impressive, almost archaic geometrical earth sculptures, which are among the most important sources of inspiration for present-day landscape architects.

Kassler described the design: ”Triangular earth mounds and a stepped cone were precisely edged, grass-sheathed, and doubled by a still pool. The garden was not so much a garden as a sculpture to walk through, abstract earth shapes independent of place, with sharp arises foreign to the nature of their material.”

theimportanceofbeingmodernist:

Barbican Water Gardens, London by Chamberlin Powell and Bon.
© 2014 Alex James Bruce
The Importance of Being Modernist : Facebook | Twitter | Instagram

theimportanceofbeingmodernist:

Barbican Water Gardens, London by Chamberlin Powell and Bon.

© 2014 Alex James Bruce


The Importance of Being Modernist : Facebook | Twitter | Instagram

synthetikweekend:

objectoccult:

Before the availability of the tape recorder and during the 1950s, when vinyl was scarce, people in the Soviet Union began making records of banned Western music on discarded x-rays. With the help of a special device, banned bootlegged jazz and rock ‘n’ roll records were “pressed” on thick radiographs salvaged from hospital waste bins and then cut into discs of 23-25 centimeters in diameter. “They would cut the X-ray into a crude circle with manicure scissors and use a cigarette to burn a hole,” says author Anya von Bremzen. “You’d have Elvis on the lungs, Duke Ellington on Aunt Masha’s brain scan — forbidden Western music captured on the interiors of Soviet citizens.”

SO AMAZING.

synthetikweekend:

objectoccult:

Before the availability of the tape recorder and during the 1950s, when vinyl was scarce, people in the Soviet Union began making records of banned Western music on discarded x-rays. With the help of a special device, banned bootlegged jazz and rock ‘n’ roll records were “pressed” on thick radiographs salvaged from hospital waste bins and then cut into discs of 23-25 centimeters in diameter. “They would cut the X-ray into a crude circle with manicure scissors and use a cigarette to burn a hole,” says author Anya von Bremzen. “You’d have Elvis on the lungs, Duke Ellington on Aunt Masha’s brain scan — forbidden Western music captured on the interiors of Soviet citizens.”

SO AMAZING.